Tuesday, 30 July 2019

MURDERS, APPREHENSIONS & MORE ... TROVE TUESDAY 30 Jul 2019




SCALES OF JUSTICE


The scales of justice are not always balanced...

The following pages are from the NSW Government Gazette as stated. It's easy to judge, but I often wonder what the story is behind these appearances. What drove these people to commit the crimes they are charged with... were they actually guilty, did they continue to find themselves on the wrong side of the law... there is always a story behind the story...
Can you add anything to the stories of the people listed?

As always, please click to enlarge...
New South Wales Police Gazette and Weekly Record of Crime (Sydney : 1860 - 1930), Wednesday 2 March  National Library of Australia http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article251643270












Just to illustrate that there is always more to a story, I chose a couple of names from the first page above.

Firstly, Julia Cullinan, who was charged with stealing a silver watch.. was she guilty or not? 




A small notice appeared in 

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser 7 Apr 1881







Also from the first page, was the name William Freeman... who had been murdered... this article gave far more details about the case... I have taken the liberty of using paragraphs for ease of reading...

The Riverine Herald (Echuca, Vic. : Moama, NSW : 1869 - 1954; 1998 - 2000), Tuesday 8 March 1881, page 3

MURDER BY A MADMAN AT
AGNES BANKS.
(HAWKESBURY CHRONICLE )


A horrible murder was committed at Agnes Banks, on Tuesday, the 22nd ult, by Robert Williams, brother-in-law of the victim, William Freeman, an old man with a large family, and much respected in the district. It appears that the murdered man was husking corn in the granary at his residence at Agnes Bank, which the murderer used as his bedroom. 

On Tuesday morning some altercation is supposed to have taken place between deceased and Williams, Mrs Freeman, wife of the murdered man, and sister of Robert Williams, hearing a noise up in the granary, went out to ascertain the cause, when she saw her husband lying with his head against a heap of unhusked corn. Blood was flowing from his head profusely. She saw Robert Williams walk away from where her husband was lying who was then in a dying state, and never spoke. A son of the deceased went to Richmond to inform the police. Dr Jockel was soon in attendance, but life was then extinct. 

On receipt of information Senior-constable McNeely and constable Miles started for the scene of the murder. They found Williams lying on the roadside about a mile from the granary where the affair took place. Mr. W. K Gibbons, J.P.,   kept a close watch on him until the police arrived. When arrested by the police the man had in his possession a large table-knife, very much worn, and long stick, Senior-constable McNeely secured Williams from behind, and Mr. Gibbons rendered what assistance he could. McNeely succeeded in taking the knife from his grasp, and threw it beyond his reach until he had secured his man. Alter being handcuffed he was taken by the police to where the deceased's body lay. McNeely asked Williams if he knew the deceased; he replied, " Is he dead ? He is not dead !" He was then charged with the wilful murder of William Freeman, to which he made no reply, and was taken to the Richmond lockup. 

In consequence of not being able to secure 12 men for a coroner's jury in the Penrith district, it was decided to hold a magisterial enquiry. This took place on the following day, Wednesday, before the coroner for the Penrith district, Dr. Jockel, surgeon, deposed to examining the body, and described the nature of the wounds inflicted. There were six wounds on the head externally, ranging from three-quarters of an inch to two inches ; two on the crown of the head, one on the left temple, and one behind the left ear. On removing the scalp it was found to be extensively fractured. One fracture extended across the top of the head, five inches in length, another on the back on the head four inches ; while the left temporal region of the skull was literally battered in. Several pieces of loose bone could be picked out, and. the brain seen underneath. The iron bar produced had on it recent marks of blood, apparently human, also human hair resembling the hair of the deceased. From the appearance and size of the wounds the bar was the instrument used by the murderer. There were no other external marks of violence on the body. 

In his (Dr. Jockel's) opinion the deceased must have been struck three times, and any of the blows would cause instant death. Mrs. Freeman deposed to finding the body in the loft. She first of all heard a scuffling in the kitchen under the loft. A granddaughter of Freeman's was in the loft at the time it took place, and witness thinking the noise too loud for a child to make, went to satisfy herself. Running to the place she met the child coming down the ladder exclaiming, " Uncle Robert is beating grandfather." She then went up the ladder. and found her husband as described! Williams made use of threatening language to her, and being afraid- she-ran off for her son, who immediately went to Richmond for Dr. Jockel and the police. The accused accounted for the knife in his possession by saying he had taken it from the child who was paring peaches with it. 

The prisoner was committed to take his trial at Darlinghurst on the 9th day of May next, for the wilful murder of William Freeman.

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser 15 May 1881  
Court case 11 May 1881



It seems that this was the only verdict that could be reached.. 
a terribly sad case.




William Freeman   Probate NSW Govt. Gazette 25 Mar 1881











Images, with thanks, from the following FREE clipart sites.. 





Tuesday, 23 July 2019

PASSENGER LISTS- INWARD / OUTBOUND / INTERNAL TROVE TUESDAY 23 JUL 2019


PASSENGER LISTS

INWARD / OUTBOUND / INTERNAL 


Geelong, should be reversed...



The following is a selection of passenger lists from 1860 - 1943, all courtesy of TROVE.... you can find numerous lists there, from all states. Just be selective as to what you are looking for.. make the search very broad to start, then browse through, changing it to more selective when you decide just what you want to concentrate on.
As always, you can click on images to enlarge or you can use the URL to go directly to the article.

 Happy browsing... do let me know if you recognise some of these names...it's always great to know if these posts are helpful.


Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 - 1929), Thursday 19 April 1860, page 2
National Library of Australia    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article148790327





Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Tuesday 4 January 1876, page 2 (7)
National Library of Australia     http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8942167














Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908), 
Tuesday 4 March 1890     National Library of Australia     
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article125075025



"Internal" travel was mostly by ship also... I have been fortunate enough to trace ancestors from state to state... just by looking through coastal travel.



The Daily Northern Argus (Rockhampton) 2 Sep 1895






You have to love this one..note the departures from Wauchope 
to Launceston..I do hope they all had their ticket.
Marrawah for Melbourne was almost as interesting.

King Island News  passengers internal 22 Jan 1919







I must remember to see if I can find anything about the GREEN in this list, quite likely to be one of my extended family as many of them lived around the Clarence.

Daily Examiner Grafton 17 Jul 1922




Victoria Quay, Fremantle, W.A. - 1915  Public domain




Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Thursday 15 December 1927, page 10
National Library of Australia    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article121691413
Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954), Saturday 7 March 1936, page 11 (3)
National Library of Australia    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article246733606





Advocate Burnie Tasmania  Inward/Outbound 2 Sep 1943




* All images are in Public Domain or are free to download

Tuesday, 16 July 2019

IMMIGRATION 1879... TROVE TUESDAY 16TH JULY, 2019



IMMIGRATION IN 1879



The 'Holmsdale' at Port Augusta [PRG 1373/2/2] • Photograph #



The last convict ship, the Hougoumont, had arrived in Western Australia in January, 1868. 

In all, around 168,000 convicted felons were transported to Australia. Though New South Wales and Tasmania, then known as Van Diemen's Land, had long ago stopped accepting convicts, Western Australia accepted them up until 1868 to add to their labour force.

Eleven years on ... below is the Passenger List for the Holmsdale* voyage from Plymouth to Adelaide, arriving March 29, 1879..

This is just one voyage by one ship... the Holmsdale...this time to South Australia..but immigration was very much in the news as the colonies over Australia were growing in this great new land. So many opportunities for a new life ...

South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Thursday 22 May 1879, page 1

IMMIGRANTS TO ARRIVE.
The following is a complete list of the emigrants on board the Holmsdale, which sailed from Plymouth on March 29: — 
Families — 
Callaghan : Andrew 40, Honora 41 ; 
Crapp : William 27, Grace 32, John 2; 
Curnon: Thomas 37, Annie 34, Thomas 8, Isaac 6, Annie 5, John 4, Amelia 2 ; 
Dale : George 44, Mary A. 43, Minnie 11; 
Dewar: Andrew 49, Elizabeth 47, Septimus 10, Richard 7, Alexander 2 ; 
Dicker : John 39, Elizabeth 39, Emma J. 11, Frederick O. 8, Mary M. 6, Amy J. 3, John 1 ; 
Eason : George 22, Harriet 21, Samuel 1 ; 
Grant : Henry 40, Catherine 38, Catherine 10, Charles 5, Margaret 1; 
Grealy: Patrick 28, Margaret 19 ; 
Hawkes : Thomas 25, Mariana 27, Matilda 5; 
Hennessy: John 29, Margaret 24, Patrick 2, Catherine 1 
Hyland : James 26, Ann 24 ; 
Layton : Ernest 41, Margaret 40, Sarah 11, Maud 6 : 
Layden : John 24, Mary 22 ; 
McGuire: Daniel 48, Margaret 30; 
McCarney: Patrick 45, Bridget 45; 
Nankervis: John 31, Mary J. 30, Emily 9, Francis 6, John 4 ; 
Oliver : Joseph 33, Hannah 34, John 11, Annie 8, Jane 6, Joseph 3 ; 
Onsley : Joseph 37, Anne 38 ; 
O'Dea : John 33, Catherine 30, Mary 11, Catherine 9, Cornelius 7, Margaret 4; 
O'Leary: James 32, Catherine 29, Thomas 10, Mary 6, Ellen 3, Kate 1 ; 
O'Neill : Terence 65, Ellen 62 ; 
Quinn : Henry 26, Mary 28 ; 
Ryan : Hugh 45, Bessy 40, Kate 10, John 8; 
Singleton: Phillip 39, Hannah 38, Kate 10, Ellen 8, Honora 3 ; 
Thomas : William 40, Catherine 30, Anne 8, William 5, Hannah 2; 
Tredren: Richard 23, Ann 26, Thomas J. 4, Anne 2 : 
Walsh : Patrick 39, Bridget 37, James 9, Rosie 6, Maggie 4, Mary K. 2 ; 
Warman : William 24, Emma 24 ; 
Wright : Thomas 24, Kate 22, John 4, Mary 2, Bridget 1. 

Single Men.— Boland : Patrick 17, David 20; Burke, James 21 ; Burns, Patrick 15 ; Callaghan: Michael 24, John 18, Andrew 20; Callaghan, Timothy 18 ; Cane, John 22 ; Carroll, Michael 21; Caston, Horace 15; Cavan, Michael 21; Cavanagh : James 40, Patrick 25, John 17 : Clarke, Michael 22 ; Cleary, Martin 18 ; Clifford : Patrick 22. Daniel 21 ; Connolly, Michael 33 ; Conroy : Thomas 29, Patrick 27 ; Considine, Michael 22 ; Cooney : Andrew 24, Philip 21 ; Corbett, Jeremiah 20; Coughlin, James 20; Coughlin, James, 22 ; Crowley, Charles 15 ; Callinan, : Daniel 22; Curry, John 18; Curtin, James 19 ; Davoran, Thomas 22 ; Dewar, Thomas 17 ; Dewar : Andrew 21, James 19 : Dillon, John 26; Doherty, Thomas 25; Doody, John 23; Duggan: Cornelius 20, Daniel 17, Denis 20; Fahy, Patrick 24 ; Fahy, Patrick 20 ; Fitzgibbon, John 22; Fogarty, John 26; Fogerty, Michael 20; Fox: Owen 17, Pat. 15; Freeman, George 58; Gallivan, Richard 22; Gibbs, Arthur 23; Grant, Frank 17 ; Guerin: Martin 16, Thomas 13 ; Haire, Patrick 17 ; Halloran, Michael 18 ; Hamilton, John 20; Hawke, Edward 22; Healy, Daniel 18; Hickey, Henry 19; Hooban, Peter 21; Kanes, Joseph 35; Keighery, John 20; Kerins, James 17 ; Killeen : Edward 22, John 20; Killeen: Thady 27, Edward 26; Leonard, Thomas 21 ; Lord : Alfred 17, Robert 24 ; Lynch, Patrick 21 ; Lyons, Timothy 21 ; McCarney, Patrick 17; McCarthy, Timothy 23 ; McGrath, James 27 ; McMahon : John 21, Bernard 18 ; McMahon, Michael 27; Madden, Patrick 30; Malone, James 23; Malony, Thomas 24; Morhon, (?) Michael 21; Mullane, John 24, Cornelius 16; Mulloy, Michael 22; Nankervis, William 12; Neagle: Patrick 19, Michael 17 ; O'Callaghan, Cornelius 19 ; O'Connor, John 28; O'Keefe: Peter 23, John 20; O'Leary, Patt 21 ; Oliver : William 17, James 14 ; O'Neill, Thomas 22 ; Onsley : Frederick 16, William 13; Pilkington, Michael 18; Rock, Andrew 21 ; Roughan : William 26, John 24, Michael 22, James 20; Ryan, Patrick 23; Saunders : Thomas 40, John 25, Joe 13; Scanlon, Denis 20 ; Scanlon, Michael 27 ; Scannell, John 21; Scorer, George 22; Shea, Daniel 22; Shea, Daniel 19; Singleton: Patrick 20, Jeremiah 15; Small, Henry 20; Sullivan, Daniel 26; Sullivan, Denis 21 : Thomas, John 12 ; Walsh : John 16, Patrick 12; Walsh, Martin 21 ; Welsh, Edmund 14. 

Single Women— Aherne, Cath. 27 ; Askeson, Daphney 27 ; Bonnell, Margaret 20 ; Bradbury, Anne 15 ; Brook : Sarah 27, Emma 21 ; Burke, Catherine 24; Burne, Ellen 39; Callaghan, Honora 18 ; Callaghan, Margaret 18 ; Callaghan, Nano 20 : Cameron, Mary 18; Carlyle, Jeannie 18 ; Cavanagh Margaret 20, Annie 18 ; Clarke, Annie 18; Clark, Mary 19; Cleary : Margaret 20, Mary 16; Clifford, Ellen 24; Cocker, Jane A. 22; Coghlan: Annie 28, William 4, Walter 1 ; Coieman, Augusta 16; Connelly, Maggie 19; Corley, Maria A. 22; Coughlin, Cath. 22; Crowley, Ellen 16 ; Crowley, Julia 20 ; Crowley, Margt. 19 ; Culver, Julia 19 ; Curtis, Mary 14 ; Dale, Charlotte 17 ; Daley, Bridget 18 ; Davidson : Elizabeth 26, James 4, Elizabeth 1 ; Davorec. Anne 17 ; Dewar, Elizabeth 14 ; Dillon, Annie 17; Dillon, Margaret 50; Dodgson, Blanche 30 ; Eustice : Margaret 18, Honora 20; Fahy: Margaret 20, Annviah 17: Faby, Julia 20; Farnsworth, Alice, 15 ; Flanaghan, Mary 19 ; Freeman, Emma 15 ; Gardner, Elizabeth 17 ; Garbey, Mary 18; Gibbins, Mary A. 33 ; Green , Margaret 20; Guerin: Ellen 38, Mary 11, William 8; Halloran: Margaret 21, Mary 16, Bridget 20; Harris, Agnes 17; Hayes: Mary 19, Ellen 17; Hennessy : Mary 20, Ellen 19 ; House, Martha 21; Hughes, Kate 26; Hunter, Mary 31; Hynes: Bridget 19, Margaret 13 ; Iwin, Mary J. 24 ; Jackson, Elizabeth A. 23 ; Kenny, Margaret 27 ; Kerin Bridget 20 ; Kilkelly, Annie 20 ; Killeen : Mary 18, Bridget 17; Kirk, Susannah 23; Lawson, Jane 21; Layton: Elizabeth 15, Theresa 13 : Leahy, Mary 20 ; Lose, Charlotte M. A. 20; McCabe, Anne 22; McCabe, Mary 20; McCarney, Margaret 16; McCarthy, Mary 20; McCarthy, Rebecca l8; McClintock: Annie 30, Alexander 9, Charlotte 7 ; McNamara, Catherine 23 ; McNamara, Margaret 17 ; Madden, Ellen 37 : Markham, Bridget 18 ; Markham, Bridget 17; Martin, Kate 27 ; Mason, Jane 30; Maloney, Catherine 18; Moore, Agnes 30; Moore, Louisa 26; Mulvihill, Mary 18; Neagle: Honora 40, Ellen 15, Owen 8, Richard 5; Nelson : Ellen 24, Emily 19; Nestor, Catherine 25 ; Noble, Jemima 19; O'Brien: Mary 21, Susan 22; O'Connor: Catherine 19, Honora 50; O'Keefe, Bridget 18; O'Leary, Margaret 12 ; Pierce, Mary 13 ; Piper : Johanna 28, Albert 6, Emil 4 ; Powell : Jane A. 18, Kate 16,  Mary A. 18 ; Priddle. Phillas 19; Pullen, Emily 18 ; Purdy, Mary A. 25 ; Read, Isabella 30; Rebbeck, Caroline 17: Reddin, Mary 21; Robinson, Charlotte 18 ; Rock : Annie 18, Mary 16 ; Rummery, Charlotte 21 ; Sannders : Bridget 22, Ann 15, Margaret 18, Mary 14; Scanlon, Bridget 22 ; Scannell : Kate 23, Hannah 19 ; Leeker, Elizabeth 17 ; Siems, Jessie 17 ; Sinclair, Anna 23 ; Snook, Mary J. 35 ; Stedman, Minnie 20; Sweeney, Kate 22; Taylor: Annie 22, Phoebe 17; Thompson, Agnes 50; Tomilty: Anne 20, Mary 19 ; Tomkinson, Jane 18 ; Walsh, Anna M. 14 ; Welsh, Mary 16.


National Library of Australia    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42978287


You can read more about the journeys of the Holmsdale here
 For other passenger lists, visit here


South Australia in 1879...
Evening Journal 26 Feb 1879


AFFAIRS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA.

FARMING IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA,

SOUTH AUSTRALIA AND SOUTH AUSTRALIANS.

FRUIT CULTIVATION IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA.

Immigration was the topic of conversation over other states as well as South Australia in 1879...some seems similar to today's news, other comments wouldn't be accepted today. We have to look at these items as they were in a different era...

Western Australia 

IMMIGRATION.       The Herald (Fremantle, WA : 1867 - 1886) Saturday 17 May 1879 p 1


Queensland

IMMIGRATION.

Dalby Herald and Western Queensland Advertiser (Qld. : 1866 - 1879) Saturday 22 March 1879 p 2


New South Wales

IMMIGRATION—NEW REGULATIONS.

Illustrated Sydney News and New South Wales Agriculturalist and Grazier (NSW : 1872 - 1881) Saturday 12 July 1879 p 19 

Tasmania

CRIMINAL IMMIGRATION.

The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) Tuesday 25 March 1879 p 2 


Victoria

IMMIGRATION.

The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954) Friday 4 April 1879 p 3


Northern Territory

TELEGRAMS. (From our own Correspondent.) ADELAIDE, Oct. 31.

Northern Territory Times and Gazette (Darwin, NT : 1873 - 1927) Saturday 1 November 1879 p 2 


There are numerous passenger lists available, some on TROVE, many available through the State archives of each State.

Here are a few to get you started...


National Archives

http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/family-history/passenger-arrivals-lists-1897-to-1966/index.aspx

http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/explore/migration/passengers.aspx


Varied

British Passenger List Recordswww.theshipslist.com/Research/ukrecords.shtml

Passengers Lists - Maritime Archiveswww.maritimearchives.co.uk/passenger-lists.html

Passenger Lists (Immigration) (Emigration) (including Scotland and ...https://www.genguide.co.uk/source/passenger-lists-immigration-emigration.../83/

Free Ships' Passenger Lists to USA, Canada, England, Australiahttps://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/

Australia, Victoria, Inward Passenger Lists, 1839-1923 - FamilySearchhttps://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/2778600

Passenger records and immigration | PROVhttps://prov.vic.gov.au/explore-collection/explore.../passenger-records-and-immigrati...

Migration Records - Irish Genealogyhttps://www.irishgenealogy.ie/en/irish-records-what-is-available/migration-records

Ships Passenger Lists to Australia and New Zealand 1800-1850https://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/toausp02.shtml



# Courtesy of the State Library of South Australia.. no known copyright  PUBLIC DOMAIN
Image approx. 1875


*
Summary
Wooden ship 'Holmsdale', 1250 tons, at Port Augusta [wooden ship 1257 gross tons. ON 31590. 206.8 x 37.7 x 22.4. Built 1858, J Reed, Sunderland. Owners Phillips and Co. registered London. c.1872 Bilbe and Co. who placed the ship under the management of Anderson, Anderson and Co., and she operated as a unit in the Orient Line. The ship ultimately passed to the ownership of Anderson, Anderson and Co. Sold to Norwegian owners she went missing in 1897. Originally employed in the India and China trades, upon sale to Bilbe and operating as an Orient liner she commenced in the Australian trade, her usual voyages being outward to South Australia and homeward from Melbourne. There is an abstract of her homeward log in 1883 in 'Blackwall Frigates'. In 'Colonial Clippers' there is a mention of her appearance in the Australian Wool Trade in various years, without much detail and 'Blackwall Frigates' gives some additional, sketchy information.].           State Library South Australia


"Holmsdale"


Tuesday, 9 July 2019

TROVE TUESDAY 9TH JULY 2019........ UNCLAIMED LETTERS, MISSING CONNECTIONS



UNCLAIMED LETTERS

Images courtesy of Pixabay

We take for granted the relative ease of communication that we have today...not so back in 1849. It's hard to imagine that in January alone there were hundreds of unclaimed letters...  how many loved ones thought they were forgotten... or missed hearing family news, good or bad? Were there lost inheritances, unclaimed by the date required... were there newborns in the family, who were never acknowledged... were messages sent in the hope of having loved ones 'get home in time'... 

Then again, I guess some deliberately avoided collecting mail. That way they could say that they knew nothing of whatever was being sent to them... convenient at times.

These lists are interesting in so many ways... not just for finding a long searched for name, then wondering howe to trace it to a discovery, but for the very vague addresses..not many street numbers, often no streets... 

Some were sent to ships ..did Captain Alder of the brig "Julia Percy" ever get his mail I wonder. What about William Barnes, blacksmith... who was needing to contact him?

Maybe James Bradick, wheelwright of Glebe, never did get that order. Someone trying to contact E. Fanning, Esquire, music teacher, might never have found the right note...

Convicts had mail waiting, some with ticket of leave.. one man is listed as formerly of Dublin... there could have been quite a number that fitted that criteria.

In reality, even today, there is always quite a lot of undelivered mail for one reason and another. While researching, I have been able to trace my husband's great grandfather around NSW and Qld, but even that hasn't provided the answer as to where and when he died... I live in hope. 

Do let us know in comments if you can claim, or hope to, any of the people listed here. Maybe someone else is searching for the same person... and can fill in some gaps for you, which is the whole reason that I create these posts...

New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), Friday 9 February 1849 (No.21  National Library of Australia  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230364437